Player-Game Descriptive Index (PGDI)

The Player-Game Descriptive Index (PGDI)

The Player-Game Descriptive Index (PGDI)

The Player-Game Descriptive Index (PGDI) is a model of describing games by means of their components. The aim is to be able to describe games and their players, as well as be able to compare games and players with each other. This model was developed in 2012 by synthesizing research done on player types and player motivations. The result was a series of 26 components, divided into six categories. The synthesis and research behind PGDI can be found on this website, and more formally may be found in the following source: Thomét, M. (2013). Using components to describe videogames and their players. In Z. Waggoner (Ed.), Terms of play: Essays on words that matter in videogame theory. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. [Link]

PGDI is still being developed and refined. The pages linked here will be the most up to date version I can link to, with whatever needed justification listed. All posts related to PGDI can be found here. Click on the links below to go to the relevant page for the category or component. For a more in-depth description of the model, how it came about and how it works, click here.

Player-Game Descriptive Index (PGDI)

Social (S)

Participation (Pa)

Mastery (M)

Community

Agency

Achievement

Competition

Challenge

Collecting

Cooperation

Power

Discovery

Multiplayer

Reward

Process

 

 

Skill

Immersion (I)

Customization (C)

Progression (Pr)

Embodiment

Building

Ability

Emotion

Experimentation

Character

Excitement

Replay

Goals

Instinct

Uniqueness

Plot

Variety

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